Credenhill Court Polish Hostel

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You can read this article in Polish via a Google machine translation

Credenhill Court in the small and picturesque village of Credenhill Herefordshire was once a hostel for Polish war veterans.

Credenhill Court
Credenhill Court – Today as the Credenhill Court Rest Home

Image attribution – derivative work. Original: © Copyright Philip Pankhurst. 2.0 Generic (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Credenhill Court Polish Hostel in Herefordshire

The Credenhill Court Polish Hostel was run by the charity The Relief Society for Poles, and the hostel closed in 1987. That year Credenhill Court Rest Home opened on the same premises as a private care home. Under an agreement reached between the Polish charity and the new owners, the remaining Polish veterans could receive continued care. Source: Hereford Times article dated 15 March 2005.

Background – The Polish Resettlement Act of 1947

The Polish Resettlement Act of 1947 came about because most Polish war veterans in the UK refused to be returned to Poland. These soldiers had fought for their freedom and ours in Poland, the UK and many other countries involved in World War II. The soldiers knew that in Poland under the communist regime, at best, they would be denied equal opportunities and, at worst, they would suffer persecution, detention and possibly death at the hands of the new regime.

To address this situation, the UK Government was forced to create the first piece of mass immigration law that would accommodate the wish of the Polish soldiers to stay in the UK. The result of this legislation was The Polish Resettlement Act of 1947, which in turn led to the formation of the post-war Polish community in the UK.

The first Polish Resettlement Camps in the UK were formed in 1946. By the end of that year, approximately 120,000 soldiers and dependants were accommodated in 265 camps throughout the UK. It is estimated, that by the end of 1949, around 150,000 Polish soldiers and their dependants had settled in the UK. Over the coming years, this number would rise to nearly 250,00 as more dependents and descendants arrived in the UK. Source: Agata Błaszczyk writing for Forced Migration Review.

Credenhill Court Polish Hostel

The residents lived in the Polish Hostel because they would have had difficulty living independent lives in the community. That was due to what today would be recognised as post-traumatic stress disorder and in some cases a lack of English language skills.

I visited the Credenhill Court Polish Hostel on many occasions, as in the early to mid-1980s, my late father was a full-time manager at the hostel. My father, who was himself a World War II veteran, was very proud of the assistance he was able to offer the residents. He was also very indebted to volunteers from the local community for their invaluable work in making life better for the residents.

Volunteers from RAF Hereford at the Polish Hostel in Credenhill

Volunteers from RAF Hereford and residents of the Credenhill Court Polish Hostel
Volunteers from RAF Hereford and residents of the Credenhill Court Polish Hostel

Aleksander Rodziewicz, the manager, receiving a donation from RAF Hereford for individual Christmas parcels for the residents. The photograph is dated December 1984 and is from the Rodziewicz family collection. The author of this photograph is unknown, and the photograph may be an orphan work. The owners of the original hard copy photograph are the Rodziewicz family. Permission is not granted by the family for the re-use of this photograph.

I would very much like to name all the people in the photograph. The volunteers and residents pictured are an important part of the history of Credenhill Court. If you have further information, please do contact me.

Central Television visits Credenhill Court

In 1983 a TV crew from Central Television visited Credenhill Court Polish Hostel to interview my father and Mr Michael Byrne, a volunteer who tirelessly gave his time to the Polish Hostel and residents. The footage from the film gives you a sense of daily life at Crednhill Court.

Watch the Video at the Media Archive for Central England (MACE)

Credenhill Court Polish Hostel. Screenshot from video at the Media Archive for Central England MACE
Credenhill Court Polish Hostel. Screenshot from video at the Media Archive for Central England MACE

View the film: macearchive.org/films/central-lobby-21071983-polish-hostel

Note that the in the description of the film, at the MACE archive, the last name of the volunteer, Michael Byrne, is incorrectly spelt as Burn.

I returned to Credenhill Court for a private visit

In the mid-2015s, my wife and I visited Credenhill Court Rest Home. We were very grateful to the management of the care home, who very kindly let us visit the home. We were equally grateful to the care home staff who showed us around. We met a Polish resident of the home who arrived long after the Relief Society for Poles transferred management to the new owners. It was fascinating to hear first-hand what life was like in the home during later times. The resident told us he was very happy living in the care home.

Afterwards, we visited St Mary’s Church and the churchyard where some of the Polish veterans now rest. The church is adjacent to Credenhill Court.

Photographs of St Mary’s Church

St Mary's Church in Credenhill
St Mary’s Church in Credenhill
St Mary's Church in Credenhill
St Mary’s Church in Credenhill

Attribution of St Mary’s Church photographs above: © Copyright Philip Pankhurst (cc-by-sa/2.0)

Some of the Polish Veterans graves in St Mary’s churchyard

Graves of Polish veterans in St Mary's Churchyard
Graves of Polish veterans in St Mary’s Churchyard
Graves of Polish veterans in St Mary's Churchyard
Graves of Polish veterans in St Mary’s Churchyard
Graves of Polish veterans in St Mary's Churchyard
Graves of Polish veterans in St Mary’s Churchyard
Graves of Polish veterans in St Mary's Churchyard
Graves of Polish veterans in St Mary’s Churchyard

Churchyard photographs above: © Copyright Nina Rodziewicz / St Mary’s Churchyard, Credenhill. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND). A link back to this web page will be most appreciated.

Memorial to the Polish Veterans in St Mary’s Churchyard

Memorial to the Polish Veterans in St Mary’s Churchyard
Memorial to the Polish Veterans in St Mary’s Churchyard

Memorial photograph above: © Copyright Nina Rodziewicz / Memorial to the Polish Veterans in St Mary’s Churchyard. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND). A link back to this web page will be most appreciated.

Appeal for Information

If you have further information (or corrections) that could help make this article about the Credenhill Court Polish Hostel more complete, please contact me. You can write to me in English or Polish.

Dedication

This article is dedicated to the memory of Polish veterans who lived at Credenhill Court Polish Hostel and to all the staff and volunteers who cared for them throughout the many years the hostel was in operation.

Related External Links

Credenhill Court Rest Home

The Hereford Times (use their search facility)

Polish Resettlement Camps In The UK 1946 – 1969

Shelter & Community: Polish Post-War Resettlement Camps in the United Kingdom at Culture.pl

The resettlement of Polish refugees after the second world war at Forced Migration Review

Polish Resettlement Act 1947 at Wikipedia

The History of The Relief Society For Poles (PDF document in Polish)

Royal Air Force Hereford – 1940 to 1994 at Credenhill Parish Council

Leominster Area Polish Society

Creative Commons Licenses

Some images in this article have a Creative Commons License.

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